Programming/Coding, Science

How to Post a Tweet using JavaScript

Source: How to Post a Tweet using JavaScript

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Programming/Coding

How to make commenting code fun?

Comment, comment comment. It must been a hell of a side job as a programmer or similar to do. We are programmers, we writes code, not documents, yada yada..

Well, that is what I thought in the first place.

WRONG!

Commenting is very very important in a long term or growing project. No matter how beautiful and readable your ‘self-documenting code’ will be. Why? The key is again, why?

Your code already does what it does, tell the computer to do things, and tell you what it does. However, why the code is even there in the first place? Why?

The first step to make documenting and reading it as a fun thing is, make it tell you why the code is there.

For instance, you have a function that writes to a configuration file on a Linux hosting server with only FTP access without SSH (I know it sucks, consider alternatives including DigitalOcean for VPS-like hosting or Bluehost also Dreamhost for SSH access).

An example comment for this scenario is – the server doesn’t have SSH access to execute Linux commands, so we implement this to write the code invoked from the execution of the web app.

And there ladies and gentleman, will make your life easier by commenting why instead of what.

Don’t repeat the code, assume the audience already understand the language and algorithm, and it is their fault for not taking enough time and effort to understand it (unless you writing clever code and cryptic algorithms, you are to blame instead).

Other keys like enforcing the use of good grammar and simplicity of the commenting language is also important too, but don’t let that stopping you from commenting your code if you are not fluent at the target language.

You are an awesome person for reading this. Why? because you have the passion to look the answer, to be a better developer, thus making your life and others easier to make reading codes and documentations an enjoyable experience.

Protect it, live it, love it, soon it is nothing for you, but a good habit.

Perl, Perl 5, Programming/Coding, Science

DevOps in Perl? Consider Rex.

Rex is a ‘Deployment & Configuration Management’ also knows as DevOps framework. Interestingly, it is in Perl, for Perl language. There is Ruby’s Chef & Puppet, Python’s Ansible, and Perl also has those frameworks too, but here I’m pointing to Rex because it will be much more familiar to Puppet, Chef and Ansible users in syntax and workflow perspectives.

Why do this in Perl?

Perl itself has been designed and well known for its powerful features on sysadmin tasks. Combine with this kind of framework, you are just gonna be much happier on getting the job done. Fortunately, if you are trying to opt to write ‘maintainable and long-term modules/scripts’ without using Rex, Modern Perl as a guideline should help you doing so, and CPAN with much lesser code in general.

Uncategorized

Bringing you the Quantum Cryptography.

So I started, finally, to work on some QKD (Quantum Key Distribution). IBM recently released a python API to their 5 qubit quantum computer. I’ve been playing around with it and found it pretty easy to use. I have only managed to entangle a couple qubits and teleport them, but gotta start somewhere. Anyway, I […]

via Quantum Cryptography — My Little Blog

Science

Hello aurora!

Aurora is back!

Wild about Scotland

Last night the aurora came back for a brief visit.  The light show was slow to get going but for a brief five minutes the sky lit up and sent purple and green pillars reaching high up towards the stars.

Charged particles from a coronal hole were forecast to reach the Earth yesterday and sure enough, once it got dark (around 9pm now that the clocks have moved to British Summer Time) my camera picked up a weak auroral arc.  I’d headed out to my usual spot, up a hill and less than 15 minutes from my house.  Aurorawatch UK had issued a red alert, the first since October 2016, so I was hopeful for a good light show.

You can read more about what triggered the aurora and where it could be seen on the Aurorawatch UK blog.  I’m pleased to say one of my pictures also features…

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